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HomeNewsTrust between community and the RCMP discussed at MMIWG hearings in Smithers

Trust between community and the RCMP discussed at MMIWG hearings in Smithers

One of the original investigators of the Alberta Williams murder case testified at the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Hearing in Smithers this week.

The 24-year-old’s body was found west of Prince Rupert at the Tyee Overpass in 1989, and the investigation is still considered open.

Garry Kerr spoke about the need for the community and the RCMP to trust each other to help gather crucial information into missing and murdered cases.

“I can’t even find the words to explain how important trust is,” said Kerr. “For a serious investigation, the police have to make that extra effort. I don’t care whether a person is First Nations, asian, blue or pink; I don’t care.”

Kerr also spoke about the importance of the commission narrowing down realistic and workable recommendations once the inquiry is complete.

Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chief Namoks has been sitting in on the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Hearings this week.

He’s also been meeting with the other hereditary chiefs on if the RCMP should be present.

“I understand that there are some family members that don’t trust the RCMP. But I think we can get more results if we can get them to listen, have their emotions come out; because the emotions will lead to open ears, with open ears comes education; with education; that’s how you move forward.”

As hereditary chiefs, we believe they (RCMP) should look the people in the eye, listen to them and be reminded they’re human.”

Namoks hopes whatever recommendations that eventually come out of the national inquiry have enough teeth that lead to action.

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