Preliminary report released into fatal Ethiopian Airlines jet crash

The preliminary report into last month’s Ethiopian Airlines jet crash says the flight crew performed all procedures from Boeing, but could not control the jet.

Ethiopia’s transport minister made the announcement Thursday morning, citing data from the doomed plane’s cockpit and voice-data recorders. The Boeing 737 Max 8 jet crashed March 10th shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 on board, including 18 Canadians.

Additional murder charges laid against suspect in New Zealand mosque shooting

The man accused of shooting worshippers at two New Zealand mosques last month will face 50 murder charges and 39 attempted murder charges in his next court appearance in Christchurch.

Police had earlier filed just a single, representative murder charge against an Australian white supremacist. The judge says Friday’s brief hearing will mainly be about the suspect’s legal representation, as he has said he wants to represent himself.

Reaction continues to ouster of two Liberal cabinet ministers

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will be at a college Thursday in Quebec talking up the skills-training spending his government has earmarked in its latest budget.

His trip comes a day after he received a chilly reception from some of the 338 young women visiting the House of Commons in the throes of the SNC-Lavalin affair. About four-dozen of the women stood and turned their backs to Trudeau while he tried to explain why he had booted two former cabinet ministers from the Liberal caucus the previous day.

Parliamentary budget watchdog still looking for information

Parliament’s spending watchdog is still asking for the Canada Revenue Agency to show him the money.

Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux says he still does not have access to all the data his office needs to determine the amount of cash the federal government loses each year to offshore tax havens and tax avoidance schemes. He says the CRA would only give his office aggregate tax data for a study his office has for years wanted to complete on Canada’s tax gap.

National task force being formed to study chronic pain

With one in five Canadians affected by chronic pain, the federal health minister is forming a national task force to delve into the matter.

Ginette Petitpas Taylor says the eight members will spend three years consulting with people across the country to provide information on how to better prevent, treat and manage chronic pain. Specifically, she wants to learn about barriers that may prevent people suffering with persistent pain from receiving the treatment they need.