After a rainy July comes a hot August in the Bulkley Valley, that means Worksafe BC has put out a heat stress warning for employers and workers.

Heat stress feels a lot like when someone is exercising with sweating and shallow respiratory rates but the difference with heat stress is the respiratory rates become more shallow. Someone with heat stress may also have dizziness, fatigue and also possible nausea.

Heat stress can easily turn into heat exhaustion or even heat stroke.

Barry Nakahara, Worksafe BC Senior Manager for Protective Field Services said that temperature is not the only factor for heat stress.

“It’s the humidity, it’s the rate that people are working at so, the workload, the amount of exertion they are having to do with their work, it’s also the clothing and whether or not they’re acclimatized,” said Nakahara.

Nakahara also said if someone is feeling symptoms of heat stress to report it to the employer immediately.

“Stay hydrated, that’s important, but if you can remove yourself from the heat environment and into the shade, change your work tasks to take on some lighter work or rest,” said Nakahara.

Last year in B.C. there were 38 accepted claims for work-related injuries caused by heat stress.

Over the weekend temperatures were seen to hit the 29-degree mark.