A legal coalition is calling on the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP to initiate a policy complaint and public interest investigation regarding the checkpoint on Morice West Forest Service Road.

The British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, Union of BC Indian Chiefs and Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chief Na’moks announced the filed complaint this morning(Thursday) during a press conference.

Chief Na’moks said the complaint against the RCMP must involve everybody. 

“It is not only a Wet’suwet’en issue, it is not a personal issue, it is not just an indigenous issue, this is a human rights issue as well, so it involves everybody,” he said. 

According to BCCLA Executive Director Harsha Walia, if someone is let in through the checkpoint one day, it is not guaranteed they will be let in the next time.

Earlier this month, the BCCLA filed a complaint after two individuals were denied access to the checkpoint.

According to Walia, the individuals were bringing food and emergency supplies. 

RCMP later called the denial of access for the two individuals was a miscommunication. 

During the press conference, Kwantlen Polytechnic University faculty member Irina Ceric said she was turned away from the checkpoint after she was allowed in previously. 

“I still have no idea why one day I couldn’t go in and one day I could go in. I returned from the Wet’suwet’enon Sunday night where I was invited up to train in legal serving, to do some legal serving and have a little bit of legal eye on the ground,” she said.

Chief Na’moks also said the RCMP is restricting the Wet’suwet’en people’s access to the territories. 

“Since the invasion on our territory it has now restricted our access to health and food, our well-being, our freedom,” he said.

The checkpoint at the 27-kilometre mark on Morice West Forest Service Road was implemented on Jan 13 after fallen trees, tires and accelerants were found in the area.