After a three day hearing on the Unist’ot’en and Coastal GasLink (CGL) dispute, a judge is now deciding whether or not to extend the temporary injunction allowing construction to continue.

In December a judge granted CGL a temporary injunction so they could access the Morice River Bridge to begin construction on the natural gas pipeline.

Council for the defendant’s Michael Lee Ross said the judge will not likely decide for a few months.

“The interim injunction lasts until such time that that decision whether to make an interlocutory injunction,” said Ross.

At the beginning of January, RCMP had to enforce the injunction after two roadblocks were erected along Morice River Service Road to block CGL from going onto Wet’suwet’en territory.

In a statement, CGL said, “the facts are now before the court, and we will await a decision. We will not comment further on this matter and remain focused on progressing construction on this important $6.2-billion natural gas pipeline project.”

Over the three days, there was a lot of back and forth over what role indigenous law should play in the decision due to the fact the Wet’suwet’en never signed a treaty giving up their rights and title to the land.

“I feel confident our laws will always supersede any other laws, and our laws have been handed down here since the time of memorial,” said plaintiff Freda Huson. “I feel sadden people are so readily able to sell the land for self-gain and not thinking about the grandchildren and the great-grandchildren.”